Exposing the LASIK Scam

One Surgeon at a Time
It is currently Tue Sep 25, 2018 6:13 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 56 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 12:36 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:23 pm
Posts: 2080
http://www.clspectrum.com/article.aspx?article=13066

Contact Lens Spectrum

Issue: July 2006

SPECIALTY LENSES

Rigid Optics with Soft Lens Comfort

A look at how the technology behind SynergEyes lenses benefits both patients and practitioners.

By Brian Chou, OD, FAAO


The development of SynergEyes (SynergEyes Inc., Carlsbad, CA) exemplifies how technological advances in several areas ? material science, manufacturing, lens design and prescribing method ? combine such that their sum effect is greater than adding the individual parts, making the trade name appropriately resonate the meaning of "synergy."



My office was one of the 23 sites that participated in the initial FDA clinical studies of SynergEyes lenses. Currently, more than 50 patients in my practice
are successfully wearing SynergEyes lenses.



In this article I'll share some of the relevant information about SynergEyes, giving a technological perspective on what differentiates this contact lens from its commodity counterparts.



Figure 1. A SynergEyes hybrid lens.

Material Science

Previous hybrid lenses had a Dk of about 14 and the firm center and soft skirt separated relatively easily. Even though some GP materials now exist with Dk values exceeding 150, until now, no manufacturer successfully developed a high-Dk hybrid contact lens because of the difficulty in bonding hydrophilic skirts to high-Dk rigid materials.

The breakthrough in material science is the proprietary Hyperbond technology that allows a strong link between a hydrophilic skirt and a highly oxygen permeable rigid center. The polymer chemists at SynergEyes developed a method to protect the GP material from alteration by the hydrophilic monomers while providing a strong bond. The technology produces intermediate layers that preserve the gas permeability, mechanical properties and index of refraction while producing a multi-zone interface. Each chemically different layer is nanometers thick. The SynergEyes rigid center has a Dk of 145 with a bond to the soft skirt that is substantially stronger than anything before, approximately 10 times stronger than previous hybrid lenses, according to company data.

Manufacturing

Today, contact lens manufacturers frequently use low-cost cast molding to make lenses. Diamond turning lathes and automation also produce precision lenses at a reasonable cost.

SynergEyes lenses are manufactured with no-polish lathing. The process utilizes vibration-free computer-numerical-controlled lathes driven by proprietary Pro80 design software. Jim Schwiegerling, PhD, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Arizona, developed this software to provide versatility for the hybrid platform extending beyond standard lathe mini-files. Spherical, toric, multifocal and rotationally non-symmetrical optical and structural designs are generated for the hybrid platform.

These methods will produce a family of lenses targeted to manage the full continuum of refractive errors. The software-driven polish-free lathed optics are ideal for a platinum standard multifocal, higher-order aberration correcting lenses and lenses for patent-pending Myopia Progression Control. The manufacturing efficiency drives the production cost of the SynergEyes lens to about one-half that of previous hybrid lenses.

Design

Previous attempts at hybrid lenses experienced limitations besides just hypoxia-related corneal neovascularization and frequent separation at the rigid-soft skirt border. The first hybrid lenses were launched nearly 25 years ago. A second-generation hybrid, SoftPerm (CIBA Vision) is still commercially available. These predecessor lenses have one skirt radius for each base curve.

The clinical research team at SynergEyes discovered a clear relationship between corneal curvature, corneal diameter and the required base curve and skirt radius needed for a successful lens fit. A plurality of skirt radii for a given base curve radius is necessary to accommodate the geometric diversity from the full range of corneal diameters. The SynergEyes lenses have the patent-pending feature of a series of available skirt radii for each rigid center's base curve.

The SynergEyes A and M designs are indicated for correcting hyperopia, myopia, astigmatism and presbyopia, in aphakic and non aphakic eyes free of disease. They are approved for daily wear for correcting up to +20.00D and ?20.00D in eyes with astigmatism up to 6.00D; for presbyopia with add requirements from +1.00D to +4.00D. Each design has two available core skirt radii and two available extended range skirt radii.

SynergEyes KC for keratoconus patients and SynergEyes PS for post-surgical patients have three skirt radii for each equivalent base curve. These lenses feature an aspheric base curve that is more forgiving on eyes that have high degrees of circumferential and radial irregularity.


The plurality of skirt radii, the aspheric base curves and the non-rotational platform are all novel for hybrid lenses, allowing the use of front-surface cylinders and de-centered multifocal optics to center the simultaneous vision features over the visual axis.

Methods of Prescribing

Low-cost cast molding yields a host of one-size-fits-all products that require little to no clinical measurement to predict their lens fit. This reduces the amount of needed practitioner expertise and chair time, saving the patients from the associated costs.

The parallel arm of contact lens evolution is toward technology-driven measurements for reducing chair time. This is analogous to the difference between over-the-counter reading glasses and professionally fit progressive addition lenses (PALs). Measurements of monocular pupillary distances with pupillometers and segment heights improve the fitting and success of PALs.

Prescribing for SynergEyes parallels that used for PALs. Corneal diameter is a major contributing variable for the fit of contact lenses, yet most clinicians don't routinely measure it. Using the horizontal visible iris diameter (HVID) allows you to empirically prescribe the SynergEyes lens with a high degree of success. Many corneal topographers and slit lamp eyepiece reticules allow for this measurement. SynergEyes has a patent-pending device, the M-Scan, that is useful for measuring corneal diameter with an accompanying lens calculator that determines the empirically recommended SynergEyes hybrid lens from keratometry, manifest refraction and HVID.

The M-Scan also measures pupil size, which enhances the success of the SynergEyes M multifocal contact lens. The SynergEyes multifocal has a center add that uses pupil diameter to determine the anterior add diameter. The device also captures the registration marks on diagnostic lenses to determine whether any optical decentration is required to center the multifocal over the pupil.

Conclusion

SynergEyes lenses are polar opposites to the one-size-fits all, mass-merchandised contact lenses. By embodying advances in material science, manufacturing, design and prescribing methods, SynergEyes lenses are directed toward practitioners who appreciate the intellect and expertise behind prescribing.




Dr. Chou is in private group practice in San Diego. He is also a consultant for the California Board of Optometry and a clinical investigator and consultant to CooperVision, SynergEyes and Ophthonix.

Lens Solves GP Instability
Lens Solves GP Instability


34-year-old male who has keratoconus complained that his rigid lenses would eject and decenter, and that his comfortable lens wearing time had decreased. Visual acuity with habitual GP lenses was 20/40+1 OD and 20/30-3 OS. Manifest refraction gave ?6.50 ?4.00 x133 and ?5.50 ?3.75 x129. Best-spectacle corrected visual acuity was 20/70- OD and 20/50- OS. Manual keratometry gave 46.50 @ 055/52.50 @ 135 (3+distortion) OD and 42.50 @ 045/47.75 @ 135 (3+distortion) OS. Slit-lamp examination showed Vogt's striae and Fleischer's ring OU.

The hybrid SynergEyes KC contact lenses were prescribed with the following parameters:

OD 5.70 BC / ?6.00D / skirt radius 8.50

OS 5.80 BC / ?5.50D / skirt radius 8.60

Resulting visual acuity was 20/30 OD and 20/30 OS. The SynergEyes lenses demonstrated substantially improved stability on the eye. The patient also reported reduced lens awareness with the SynergEyes lenses than with his habitual rigid lenses.

Discussion

The SynergEyes lens combines a high-Dk rigid gas permeable center optic with a soft hydrophilic skirt. Unlike the lower-Dk SoftPerm (CIBA Vision), SynergEyes is not prone to junctional separation.

SynergEyes also provides a soft skirt with a specifiable radius to accommodate a wider variety of eyes. While it's common for keratoconus patients who are wearing standard rigid lenses to end up viewing through the peripheral optics of a decentered lens, the soft skirt of SynergEyes positions the rigid optic so that vision correction is stable even in various fields of gaze. The SynergEyes soft skirt also minimizes discomfort related to GP lid-lens hypersensitivity.

? Brian Chou, OD, FAAO

_________________
Broken Eyes

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 12:51 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:23 pm
Posts: 2080
FDA approval of SynergEyes PS.

http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/pdf6/K060102.pdf

_________________
Broken Eyes

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2006 12:24 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:23 pm
Posts: 2080
Email from SynergEyes regarding the release of the PS design:

Quote:
The SynergEyes PS lens (post-surgical) will be released on November 13, 2006. To locate a SynergEyes prescriber near you, please access our doctor locator found on our website at www.synergeyes.com .

Thank you for your interest!

Brandie Lamprou
Director of Practitioner Support
SynergEyes,Inc.
2232 Rutherford Rd.
Carlsbad, CA 92008
p: 877-733-2012
d: 760-444-9608
f: 760-476-9340


Email: blamprou@synergeyes.com

_________________
Broken Eyes

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato


Last edited by Broken Eyes on Sat Feb 03, 2007 1:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 08, 2006 6:42 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Fri Mar 17, 2006 12:17 am
Posts: 113
let hope the post-refractive version of the synergeyes doesnt induce as much myopia. i have heard reports of several diopters


Top
 
 Post subject: Synereyes user review
PostPosted: Sat Nov 04, 2006 12:10 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 10:58 pm
Posts: 130
Here's my 2 cents on Synereyes:

The visual quality is OK but the fitting still needs quite a bit of works, not good enough for night driving. I think the new PS type is a better bet.

I can wear Synereyes for a longer period of time as compare with the other intralimbal RGP lenses.

I never have dry eye feeling but staining test shows that I may have dry eye, probably a minor one. I don?t feel like needing eye drops whether I?m wearing contact lens or not. FYI, I had R.K. not LASIK. I think my eyes lost some sensitivity after R.K. so that my eyes' dryness may not be as mild as I think.

I can remove Synereyes pretty quick - less than 30 seconds for each eye, no plunger is needed. Keep in mind I can remove the other RGP lenses even quicker?glad I lost the plunger. :)


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 04, 2006 1:23 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 6:57 pm
Posts: 16
Quote:
can wear Synereyes for a longer period of time as compare with the other intralimbal RGP lenses.


What does intralimbal mean?


Top
 
 Post subject: synergeyes
PostPosted: Sat Nov 04, 2006 2:24 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:16 am
Posts: 112
Thanks for the synergeyes info.I thought these were supposed to be released months ago.
One thing about them,they will not refund your money even if you can't use them.I lost my money to them on the regular type,which I could not wear.
I have since given up on being able to tolerate contacts and have decided to risk lasik fixing what damage it has created.You know I'm desperate. :wink:


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 04, 2006 3:15 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:23 pm
Posts: 2080
An email from another LASIK patient, her technique for removing SynergEyes lenses:

Quote:
I use my thumb, nail side facing the floor, and slide the thumbnail under the lower edge of the lens and pull it off. When it's far enough off that I can pinch it against my index finger, I just pull it straight out from my eye. I've been doing this for a few months now, and never have any trouble removing them at all, dry or not.

I think the pinching motion helps the juncture weaken---my method is easier on the lens, according to the technician at my OD's office after watching me do it. You have to be careful not to scratch your eye or jab it with your thumb, but if you have a steady hand, try it!

_________________
Broken Eyes

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2006 11:55 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 10:58 pm
Posts: 130
Fred wrote:
Quote:
can wear Synereyes for a longer period of time as compare with the other intralimbal RGP lenses.


What does intralimbal mean?


It literally means "within the marginal region of the cornea of the eye by which it is continuous with the sclera".

An intralimbal lens is typically a RGP lens that is about 11.0 mm or larger in diameter and covers only the cornea area.

Based on my numerous RGP lens trial experiences, intralimbal lens is more stable than smaller size RGP lens but both of them are "uncomfortable" to wear. I can tolerate them but I have a strong urge to remove them after 2 to 3 hrs of wearing.


Top
 
 Post subject: Technique for removing Synereyes lenses
PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2006 12:26 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 10:58 pm
Posts: 130
Here is my technique for removing Synereyes lenses and Macrolenses.

My technique is similar to the one shown below but instead of blinking out the lens, I would keep my eye open, tilt my head down and try to make a little movement of my eyeball to nudge out the lens. Right now, I can remove the lens in each eye in seconds with no mirror, no plunger. Unfortunately, if you have sticky lenses, this method is not likely to work.

http://www.contact-lens-help.com/how-to ... lenses.htm

Excerpt:
It?s much better to remove the right contact lens first. Using the hand closest to the contact lens you are removing reach up and place a finger on each eyelid. Pull the eyelids towards the nearest ear until they are taught. The idea behind this technique is to get the top and bottom edges of the lens to rest upon the respective taught eyelid. You may need to a bit of fiddling to get this to work (it took me several attempts the first time). Once you think you have a good grip (with the eyelids) on the lens blink and it should just pop out into your other hand.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
The technique mentioned above is pretty effective but I usually start with the ?left? contact lens first. Once I catch the lens with my right hand, I would put it on the palm of my left hand and repeat the same procedure with the right lens. After the right lens is removed, both lenses should be on the palm of my left hand, I would clean them at the same time. With practice, it?s pretty much ?instantaneous? and takes very little time to remove the lenses. I tried to time it last week and on average it took about 2 seconds to remove each lens.

P.S. I tried to blink out smaller RGPs in the past but sometimes ended up having the lens slipped under some ?hidden? places under my eyelids?not a pleasant scene :(. Now I prefer to make a little eyeball movement to nudge out the lens while keeping my eye open.

Another technique is to grip the Synereyes lens with your thumb and index finger. I gave it a few tries but with little success. The partially hard and soft surface is hard to get a good grip on and I don?t like the feeling of touching my eyeball due to my concern of accidentally scratching it and the possible germs from fingers.

_____________
Surgieyes


Last edited by surgieyes on Wed Nov 15, 2006 1:13 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 
 Post subject: To dianekimby
PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2006 10:14 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:06 am
Posts: 621
Diane,

Since your eyes are not terribly dry you may consider trying Z waves. See Ken Maller in Florida, he's the best zWave fitter. If you want to have reverse geometry RGPs go see an expert fitter. Someone who sees damaged post-LASIK patients a LOT. There are only a few good ones and you'll likely have to travel, but your odds of actually being able to see well with the lenses will be dramatically increased with an experienced fitter.

The different types of lenses out there all seem to work for some people and not others. Each patient must experiment to find the best correction. Sometimes it's glasses and permanently distorted vision... due to inability to tolerate contact lenses because of surgically-induced dry eye and other considerations such as extreme spectacle blur and drifting prescriptions.

After corneal refractive surgery, corneas are permanently irregular. Such corneas can represent a huge challenge to the lens fitter. They can also be a huge challenge to live with.

_________________
We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark. The real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light. -Plato


Top
 
 Post subject: synergeyes PS
PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2006 9:48 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:16 am
Posts: 112
I saw a new optometrist today about the synergeyes PS lenses,someone with a lot of experience with post lasered eyes.She did lots of testing(I was there 3 hours) and found that the RGP's I am now wearing are too loose on one side and too tight on the other adding to the discomfort.
She was very helpful and actually called synergeyes while I was there.They are working out the bugs,so the lenses are only available for clinical trials at present.The new official release is in March.
Meanwhile she is having a new set of RGP's made for me that should fit much better.My fingers are crossed.


Top
 
 Post subject: Hi lasick!
PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2006 2:03 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:06 am
Posts: 621
I'm keeping my fingers crossed for you , too. After all you have been through with your 'LASIK disaster' you deserve a break. Perhaps the new Optometrist and these new lenses will be it! Please keep us posted!

_________________
We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark. The real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light. -Plato


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 1:35 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:23 pm
Posts: 2080
I received this email from SynergEyes in response to a question I submitted on their website about cleaning protein deposits on the lenses.

Quote:
SynergEyes recommends digitally cleaning (rubbing with fore finger) the lens to keep protein from building up. Opti-Free Express or Clear Care are the solutions that work the best. I would personally recommend using a nightly enzyme cleaner as well. Supra Clens by Alcon is our approved enzymatic cleaner. Please consult with you chosen eye care provider for further assistance.

Susan Glasgow
Customer Care Supervisor
760-444-9611
sglasgow@synergeyes.com

_________________
Broken Eyes

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato


Top
 
 Post subject: synergeyes PS
PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 6:11 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:16 am
Posts: 112
Are these lenses ever going to be released?
Last thing I heard,the date had been moved up to december? :roll:


Top
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 56 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group  
Design By Poker Bandits