Exposing the LASIK Scam

One Surgeon at a Time
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 Post subject: Zyoptix and Dry Eyes
PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2006 5:11 pm 
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On July 23rd 2006 I had the Zyoptix laser eye surgery through LasikMD. Right after the surgery I was one of those 1 in a 1000 people to have excessive burning. Since the surgery I am constantly being told that I have very dry eyes. I have been told to put drops in every hour, starting with Artelac and moving to Refresh Endura and using Liposic at night. I was duped into having the temporary plugs put in my eyes which after being told "You'll notice a HUGE difference in the next 24hrs" I didn't notice any change whatsoever. They are now recommending the permanent plugs. (neither of which are covered by my health plan OR by the supposed "all inclusive" Zyoptix procedure). I don't have any crazy goopyness beyond a bit in the morning and it's not really white...more like normal sleep goop. But since my surgery I have not been able to sleep more than 5 hours without having to get up and relube my eyes. I work as a computer security specialist so my job is to be on the computer most of the day. I am contemplating requesting the Restasis drops and/or using the Bio Tears supplement (if they are available in Canada). Any suggestions or similar situations? Everyone's comments on this board have petrified me of the potential problems in the years to come.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2006 10:35 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2006 3:23 am
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Location: Southern California
I've been on Restasis for about 2 months and find that it does help a little, but I don't like the fact that it's an immunosupressant and has been linked to lymphomas in mice when taken in lager doses. Since surgery, I have been diagnosed with extreme dry eye, poor tear film (too oily), and blepharitis, which is very painful. I, also, can't sleep at night because of dryness and pain. I also take Doxycycline, flaxseed, fish oil, and I scrub my eyes twice a day with baby shampoo, as instructed by my doctor -- not my surgeon. My surgeon operated on me even though he knew I was likely to suffer extreme dry eye because my pre-op tear production was very low (4mm w/Schirmer's test). He collected the data and then ignored it and didn't inform me about it. Now I suffer constant pain.

It was suggested by my therapist -- yes, therapist -- that I try to contact Dr. Sheffer Tseng in Florida. Apparently he has had some success with extreme dry eye cases and is more of an academician/researcher than a surgeon, although he does perform surgery.

Good luck and I hope you find relief soon.

Marcalans

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2006 1:21 pm 
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Kiki,

You may still experience some additional nerve recovery and symptomatic relief since your surgery was just a few months ago.

In the meantime use drops, drink plenty of fluids and try fish oil, antioxidant vitamins and perhaps doxycycline. I tried restasis and it didn't help. Some claim that it has helped. Panoptyx goggles, which look like sporty sunglasses but have a moisture seal may be good for you - they are available with clear lenses, and you could wear them while you work on the computer and try sleeping with them.

A humidifier near your bed may help.

You should also consider confronting your doctor about the life-altering nature of your condition and asking why he continues with a surgery known to cause nerve damage in healthy eyes.

Giving him a copy of THE LASIK REPORT would be sufficient if you don't feel up to a confrontation. It is available in PDF form at http://thelasikreport.com

How is your vision?

Plugs did help me a great deal. I couldn't function without them, although 3 years after surgery there are still times when my eyes bother me a great deal. I also find that the dryness affects my vision.

Keep us posted on your healing... you are still healing... and let us know which therapies work best for you.

So sorry that you had this surgery. The public deserves more protection from laser eye surgeons and the laser industry.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2006 10:31 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2006 3:23 am
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Location: Southern California
Went back to the doctor yesterday and was told that I now have meibomian gland dysfunction. The meibomian glands are not pumping out enough oil to stabilize the tear flow, so I have very rapid evaporatioin and tear breakup. I am now using warm compresses more frequently. I bought the Bed Buddy Sinus Pack, which is just a little bean bag that can be repeatedly heated in a microwave and placed over the eyes. I feel that this does bring me temporary relief and I use it as often as possible. Meanwhile, my surgeon told me to stop using all analgesics and sleep medications because he thinks that they just exacerbate the dry eye condition. This puts me in a real dilemma because I am in constant pain. The surgeon wants me to try PredForte (Prednisolone Acetate) for a week to ease the pain, but I worry about the side effects of topical steroids, even if only for a week -- and what happens after the week is over anyway?

Kiki, do you know anything about your pre-operative tear flow evaluation? Did your doctor perform a Schirmer's test or any other tear flow diagnostic? If so, can you share the results?

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 Post subject: Surgeons often blame patient for surgically-induced issues
PostPosted: Sat Nov 11, 2006 12:35 am 
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Meibomian gland dysfunction is almost unheard of in young males. Your nerves have been damaged and your eyes are drier. Meibomian gland dysfunction, if you do have this, is likely secondary to dryness and inflammation caused by your surgery... resulting in blockage of your meibomian ducts.

After corneal refractive surgery you ALSO have a lumpy, irregular and flattened ocular surface - nothing like the smooth round surface that held a tear film so easily BEFORE surgery. Think of waves breaking up on a coral reef. I borrowed that analogy from another patient, but I'm sure he wouldn't mind. :wink:

Many doctors will go to any lengths to blame patients for problems that the surgeons themselves created with their medically unneccessary, harmful surgical procedures.


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 Post subject: Still on the bumpy road to recovery...hopefully
PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2006 7:47 pm 
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Well after going in for yet another check up (probably the 15th in like 3 and a half months), yet another doctor made yet another recommendation and actually had the gall to tell me that since I'm on birth control pills, it's likely slowing down the healing process and that I don't need plugs. Apparently everything is healing just fine. If everything is healing fine, why doesn't it FEEL fine? I have an appointment in a few weeks with an optometrist and hopefully they can provide me with more information and not continual changes in opinion that, of course, revolve around the fact that my eyes are fine.

My vision varies. If my eyes are moist and i haven't been looking at anything (computer, TV, book) for any length of time, it's clear and about 20/20. But thats rare. Everything is a little fuzzy (because of the dryness or so I'm told) and my right eye (the drier of the two) is overcompensating to the point that I can actually feel it straining at times, when the left doesn't. Wierd, non?

But yeah my surgury wasn't that long ago so I'm still keeping my fingers crossed that I haven't developed any major problems. *sigh* Why can't anything ever be as easy as they say it is?


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 Post subject: Hi Kiki!
PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2006 1:17 am 
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Consider wearing some Panoptyx goggles with clear lenses for your computer work. Google 'Panoptyx' for more information.

You probably know already that dry eye affects your visual quality. Dry eye is also the most common complicaton of LASIK, but LASIK surgeons perform a surgery known to do lasting harm to the eyes of their patients because it makes their wallets fat.

You have nothing to lose by taking your informed consent documents to your doctor and demonstrating how inadequate they are, and then asking him how he has the nerve to do this to patients and call himself a doctor. For some reason patients think they need their corneal refractive surgeons after they have had LASIK and therefore need to be nice to them. :twisted: Not true. The faster you dump your LASIK surgeon and replace him with an Opthalmologist who does NOT perform LASIK the better. Keep your follow up appointment schedule with your regular doctor if you have paid for it, but don't expect him to tell you the truth about your complications.

Post-refractives should consider finding a retinal specialist. A retinal specialist is an Ophthalmologist, and can also treat issues such as dry eye - best of all he/she is more likely to honestly admit what caused your post-refractive issues. The surgeon who caused your complications is motivated to cover up the problems he or she created. The two big dangers faced by post-LASIK are retinal problems and ectasia, and your retinal specialist can keep monitor you for both of these vision threatening post-surgical complications.

What post-refractives really need are annual photographs of their fundus so that early signs of glaucoma can be observed before there is actual peripheral vision loss. Ocular pressure measurements are invalid after corneal refractive surgery, therefore glaucoma cases may be undiagnosed - unless patients see a retinal specialist regularly for annual photographs of the fundus.

Best of all, when you see a retinal specialist, you won't be putting money back in the pocket of the LASIK industry.

Nice of your doctor to blame your birth control pills for a surgically-induced problem. I'm sure that your doctor didn't mention... before your surgery so that you received FULL informed consent... that after menopause your eyes would be drier with or without surgery, and that surgery places you at an increased risk of debilitating dry eye disease now, and especially later in life.

Corneal refractive surgeons who are actively performing surgeries in spite of solid medical eveidenc that the surgeries are harmful to patients, are, in my opinion, monstrous butchers... and should be treated with the respect that they deserve (absolutely none).


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