Exposing the LASIK Scam

One Surgeon at a Time
It is currently Mon Dec 17, 2018 7:44 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 51 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Is LASIK patient-driven or physician-driven?
PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2006 12:53 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:23 pm
Posts: 2080
I say it's physician driven. If it were patient-driven, there would be no need for heavy marketing and LASIK counselors (salespersons) who are hired to close the sale.

http://www.lasereye.com/newsarchives.html

Quote:
Lasik is presented as patient driven. That is simply not true. Certainly the patient wants the utopia portrayed by Lasik. Unfortunately, that cannot always be delivered. What the patient does want is honesty.


From Bill's post:
http://www.eyeworld.org/article.php?sid=3002

Quote:
As the public becomes more familiar with ophthalmic procedures such as LASIK, advertising should focus more on persuading customers instead of educating them.

_________________
Broken Eyes

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2006 1:12 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:23 pm
Posts: 2080
Look what I just found. How weird, it was published the month I had LASIK -- June, 2000.

http://www.aao.org/aao/news/eyenet/arch ... tlook.html

LASIK Advertising Is Testing Our Professionalism

by H. Dunbar Hoskins Jr., MD

During the last several months I have seen and heard many examples of refractive surgery "marketing." Some of these are billboards prominently displayed along streets and highways, some are in airline magazine advertisements, some are in shopping centers where live surgery is shown via video to shoppers along the mall. Some offer a lucky raffle winner heavily discounted or free LASIK. All are intended to entice patients to have surgery.

Many years ago, advertising by physicians, lawyers or other professionals was prohibited. About 20 years ago, the Federal Trade Commission determined that the inability of professionals to advertise prevented the dissemination of information to the public and therefore interfered with the competitive forces that are intended to drive market costs down. When it lifted the restrictions, it began a process that would force professionals to adopt competitive behavior. Certainly we are realizing the effect of that in LASIK. Recently more and more advertisements have touted lower-cost LASIK, discounts for bilateral LASIK and further price reductions. As the competition continues to heat up, price reductions will continue.

But is price the most important issue? How do we reconcile this promotion of treatments with our role as professionals?

A professional is defined as someone "engaged in one of the learned professions: characterized by or conforming to the technical or ethical standards of a profession."

In medicine our role as professionals is to put the patient's interest ahead of our own. Professional societies have had ethical standards that underscore the importance of that principle. Historically this went unquestioned. It was a medical need that caused the patient to seek out the physician. Similarly referrals from one physician to another have been based on the qualities of the receiving physician and the needs of the patient.

Now this principle is being tested as we see increasing efforts to attract or even entice patients into practices. This is a continuation of an activity that began with cataract surgery some 10 years or so ago. It is the nature of a competitive marketplace. It also sends a strong message to the consumer: "Let the buyer beware."

Some of my colleagues explain that advertisements and promotional materials are intended to reduce the "fear" patients have of surgery. But perhaps the fear is rational. Perhaps this procedure should not be trivialized because although it can bring great benefit, it has the potential to do serious harm. OMIC, the Ophthalmic Mutual Insurance Company, has seen a rapid rise in the number of lawsuits generated through refractive surgery over the last 12 months. One would guess this escalation will continue because patients' expectations may be unrealistically high because of all the promotional material around.

While ethical and legal issues abound, this trend toward advertising is indicative of something more profound: We are going through a major societal transition. Those of you who may have read Death of the Guilds, by Elliott Krause, are familiar with the concept of the three-legged stool supported by the state, capitalism and professionalism. The idea is that these three bring different values that benefit society. Mr. Krause argues that professionalism is losing power to capitalism.

The state provides order, capitalism provides competition and productivity (often in a self-serving way), and professionalism provides the ethical and moral guidance for societies to continue to function compassionately and with altruism. If any leg becomes too strong, society's values shift. Indeed, during the '50s and '60s, professionals, partly due to an inadequate supply, became stronger and could demand greater rewards for themselves. In response, the capitalist sector reacted and created managed care.

In today's world, professionalism is clearly under attack. Despite hopeful signs, such as the House Judiciary Committee's recent passage of a collective negotiations bill, this is not enough to compensate for the overall shift we have seen toward the market side. There seems to be a devaluation of characteristics such as intellectualism, altruism, service to others and ethics, while the "bottom line" mentality of capitalism is increasing.

Perhaps medicine has gotten so complex that professionalism is not enough. The cost of health care is tremendous. The day when a single physician could take care of all of a patient's illnesses has long since passed. It is becoming more difficult for any one individual to act as the patient's advocate in the face of serious disease.

Nevertheless, in areas as complex as health care, the patient needs a trustworthy advocate. Where will that come from? Will it be the corporation? How will that impact the patient? Will that further erode the physicians' autonomy and the power of the profession?

The battle between professionalism and capitalism is not over. I believe we need professionalism in society just as much as we need capitalism and state controls. The rise of one to the detriment of either of the other is dangerous. We will have to fight constantly for professionalism if we want that balance.

_________________
Broken Eyes

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2006 1:24 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:23 pm
Posts: 2080
OSN Supersite
http://www.osnsupersite.com

TOP STORIES 3/27/2006

Find ?tipping point? to convert potential LASIK patients, marketing expert says

Excerpts:

"Triggers that convince potential refractive surgery patients to move ahead with the surgery are varied, and successful practices will find ways to highlight those emotions, said James M. Tenny, here at the American Society of Ophthalmic Administrators meeting."

?The bottom line is consumers are generally OK with the vision correction they have,? said Mr. Tenny, who is a partner at Della Femina Rothschild Jeary & Partners marketing firm. ?Until they present with a problem with their current vision, they?re not going to seek correction.?

"All office personnel need to identify the potential customer, he said. Advertising should play a role in that identification."

?You need to find a trigger event; that will be the primary reason to entice someone into making a decision,? he said, even if the decision is to stop what the customer is doing, pick up a phone and call to find out more about refractive surgery."

?Advertising for your practice should focus on reminding people what they don?t like about their contact lenses or glasses,? he said.

_________________
Broken Eyes

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2006 5:05 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2006 2:13 am
Posts: 19
Some religions talk about worshipping False Idols.

The doctors that become involved with LASIK appear to have been offered a vision of Paradise, where they can make $X per year if they do certain things.

It sounds like some of the doctors that do LASIK are pursuing that vision of Paradise that they were sold.

To answer the question, physician driven.

Do I get a prize ?


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2006 12:25 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:23 pm
Posts: 2080
stillhere wrote:
To answer the question, physician driven.

Do I get a prize ?


Unfortunately it's a booby-prize, to realize that you were deceived by a doctor who swore an oath to "First, do no harm".

_________________
Broken Eyes

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato


Top
 
 Post subject: Definitely physician-driven!
PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2006 12:48 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2006 7:17 pm
Posts: 161
My doctor certainly wasn't eager to tell me the things I would have needed to know to make an informed decision about LASIK. I NEVER would have had this procedure if I had known a FRACTION of the damage caused to the eye and about the decrease in visual quality.

Definitely physician driven. No patient would want this surgery if they fully understood it and its consequences.


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 30, 2006 5:28 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Fri Mar 17, 2006 12:17 am
Posts: 113
lasik is driven by the silence of people who know better and dont want to get involved. many of them are optometrists and even ophthalmologists who dont want pressure from their peers.

just as responsible are patients who are too lazy to post or speak out. if every patient who was damaged would tell just one person a day or post on a bulletin board somewhere there would be no lasik.

our anti-marketing is 1000 times stronger than their marketing. its far easier to tear down than build up, far easier to destroy than to create. we can destroy lasik, but we have to want to.


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 16, 2006 11:25 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 11:21 pm
Posts: 7
I don't know about you, but I'm too depressed to fight anyone, especially anyone with a lot of money and lawyers, and LASIK providers have both. Have you ever seen a fight where one person is blind? It's a very short fight.

Marvin


Top
 
 Post subject: Fighting back may help you overcome depression
PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2006 1:34 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:06 am
Posts: 621
Marvin,

We have an obligation to each other to protect each other and have concern for the public health. Most areas of the country have a LASIK clinic that is robbing patients of visual quality and eye health. These clinics are marketing their 'services' as medicine. To quote one member, 'this is NOT medicine'.

Have a friend drive you each Thursday and Friday to different LASIK clinics in your area to picket. Most surgeries are performed near the weekend so that patients will be at home when they realize they can't see/aren't recovering as quickly as promised.

So make yourself a sign and get out there.

Talk to people. It's a wonderful feeling to spak the truth, and you have the right of free speech. As long as you don't lie you are in the clear. Stay off private property. You can usually find a spot on the easement near the street where the patients drive in to picket. Bring some suntan lotion, a hat, a lawn chair, bottled water... and plenty of flyers. Beats the hell out of hanging around at home depressed. It may even make you feel energized and empowered!

We can post some flyers on this site that you can use.


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2006 6:10 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Mon Apr 17, 2006 5:34 pm
Posts: 9
They just want to sweep us under the rug and never see us again, and if they can do it, then there's no reason for them to help us. Patients with complications sit too long in the chair and don't bring in the money. New patients bring in the money, and its money that refractive surgeons care about, not people.

So when you post and protest and tell the truth about your eyes, you are really helping yourself more than you know. Until they know that we can affect their money, they'll just turn their backs on us and shrug and say too bad for you.

J.


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2006 7:18 pm 
Offline
 E-mail  WWW  Profile

Joined: Tue Nov 15, 2005 5:52 pm
Posts: 127
American Society of Ophthalmic Administrators Promotes Irresponsible Marketing Practices

http://www.lasikfraud.com/news/archives/000108.html


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 11:33 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Thu Nov 24, 2005 9:06 pm
Posts: 297
OCULAR SURGERY NEWS 4/15/2006
Technology, industry cooperation heralded by new ASCRS president

Excerpt:

Find ?tipping point? to convert potential LASIK patients, marketing expert says

Triggers that convince potential refractive surgery patients to move ahead with surgery are varied, and successful practices will find ways to highlight those emotions, said James M. Tenny, at the American Society of Ophthalmic Administrators meeting.

In his keynote address, Mr. Tenny polled the several hundred audience members and found that 30% spend less than 2% on advertising or marketing, and 34% spent less than 5% of the center?s budget on advertising or marketing. Overall, the administrators said they believe fear and cost are the leading two reasons why patients opt out of refractive surgery once it has been offered.

?The bottom line is consumers are generally OK with the vision correction they have,? said Mr. Tenny, who is a partner at Della Femina Rothschild Jeary & Partners marketing firm. ?Until they present with a problem with their current vision, they?re not going to seek correction.?

All office personnel need to identify the potential customer, he said. Advertising should play a role in that identification.

?You need to find a trigger event; that will be the primary reason to entice someone into making a decision,? he said, even if the decision is to stop what the customer is doing, pick up a phone and call to find out more about refractive surgery.

?Advertising for your practice should focus on reminding people what they don?t like about their contact lenses or glasses,? he said.

Within a center?s advertising, ?gear your message to a specific target,? he said.

Emphasis should be placed on the trigger event and first physician contact, he added. Trigger events that have worked include targeting people who play sports, who have ocular allergies or who need better vision for work.

?Fourth, you need to provide a non-threatening first step for these people,? he said. Allow the potential patient to qualify him- or herself as a potential candidate, he said.

Once the potential patient has contacted a center, ?stay with them,? Mr. Tenny said. Follow up with phone calls or letters.





This sounds "physician-driven" to me.

_________________
Bill

"What concerns me is that if the person informing the patient is themselves poorly or inaccurately informed then how on earth can consent ever be truly informed?" Dr. Sarah Smith


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 24, 2006 11:57 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:23 pm
Posts: 2080
http://www.crstoday.com/PDF%20Articles/ ... 06_20.html

"and (3) the ability to look a patient in the eye and ask him to commit to surgery using options instead of standard yes-or-no techniques. For example, "Would you rather continue putting up with glasses and contacts or enjoy clearer, more natural vision with LASIK?"




Sounds like a used-car salesman to me.

_________________
Broken Eyes

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato


Top
 
 Post subject: Of course, more false LASIK advertising!
PostPosted: Wed May 24, 2006 3:26 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2005 4:28 pm
Posts: 643
About the author of the disturbing article above has provided contact information. If you have comments you would like to extend to Mr. Malley, his contact information is below.

By the way, Mr. Malley, LASIK does NOT provide clearer, 'more natural vision'... there is nothing natural about having a permanent split in your cornea, surgically induced distortions and fried nerves.

Quote:
Michael W. Malley is President and Founder of the Centre for Refractive Marketing (CRM Group), an ophthalmic consulting/advertising agency established in 1988. Mr. Malley may be reached at (713) 839-0202; mike@refractivemarketing.com.


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 26, 2006 11:40 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:23 pm
Posts: 2080
http://www.escrs.com/Publications/Eurot ... resent.pdf

Cataract and refractive surgery is leading the way in direct-to-consumer marketing. For LASIK alone, some $140 is spent on advertising per treated eye. All too often claims are simplistic and misleading (?20/20 for $2995? or ?20/20 promise?), and not supported by data. Says Koch: ?False advertising deceives patients, fosters poor patient decisions regarding having a procedure, demeans our profession, and is a violation of the implied pact between physician and patient.?

_________________
Broken Eyes

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato


Top
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 51 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group  
Design By Poker Bandits