Exposing the LASIK Scam

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 Post subject: retinal detachment
PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2007 10:38 pm 
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Hiya. Just a quick question to anyone that can assist. I recently found out that the wife of an ex-coworker suffered a retinal detachment more than four years post lasik. Is this most likely due to lasik? Her husband advised that it was completely out of the blue and that the cause was not known. This lady was very pro lasik when I met her at a function a couple of years ago ('just a little dry eye'). Unfortunately I didn't get alot of detail from her husband as we just bumped into each other and caught up briefly. I also suspect that there may be some defensiveness around this issue. Please post any info when you can. Thanks


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2007 12:07 am 
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Well, if you want *my* opinion, I'd say there could be a connection between LASIK and retinal detachment, even years later. The suction ring is known to cause posterior vitreous detachment, which may progress to retinal detachment.

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 Post subject: Retinal detachment after LASIK happened to my neighbor
PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2007 12:35 am 
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I have neighbors in my community who gave their son LASIK for Christmas. He ended up with a retinal detachment in one eye, and poor vision in the other. He is in his twenties.

This happened in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Definitely, the two are associated. He was a high myope and at higher risk for retinal detachment anyway. Along comes the suction ring, and induces retinal detachment.

Of course the doctor denied any connection. I don't know how he attempted to explain away the poor vision in the other eye.

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 Post subject: Re: retinal detachment
PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2007 1:33 pm 
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grateful wrote:
Her husband advised that it was completely out of the blue and that the cause was not known. This lady was very pro lasik when I met her at a function a couple of years ago ('just a little dry eye'). Unfortunately I didn't get alot of detail from her husband as we just bumped into each other and caught up briefly. I also suspect that there may be some defensiveness around this issue.


Yeah...cognitive dissonance. As a defense mechanism, they are probably more likely to put the blame on NATURAL CAUSES, because that's a bit easier to swallow than admitting that they made a CHOICE that CAUSED the problem.

Scientist wrote:
I have neighbors in my community who gave their son LASIK for Christmas. He ended up with a retinal detachment in one eye, and poor vision in the other. He is in his twenties.

This happened in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Definitely, the two are associated. He was a high myope and at higher risk for retinal detachment anyway. Along comes the suction ring, and induces retinal detachment.

Of course the doctor denied any connection. I don't know how he attempted to explain away the poor vision in the other eye.

That?s horrible. They must feel TERRIBLE! :cry: They though they were giving a nice gift that would change his life for the better, and look how it turned out!

Once the retina detaches, does that mean that the person is completely and totally blind in that eye?

I didn't know that high myopes are naturally at a higher risk for retinal detachment...and worse so after LASIK.

My LASIK surgeon reassured me that my -8 script made me no less of an awesome candidate for LASIK than anyone else.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2007 3:14 am 
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Quote:
I have neighbors in my community who gave their son LASIK for Christmas. He ended up with a retinal detachment in one eye, and poor vision in the other. He is in his twenties.



That is horrible. My Mother thought about getting it done and I told her there was no way I would let her do it knowing what I know now.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2007 3:23 am 
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I am a 40 year old high myope (-8 for like 10 years) and I seem to recall my optometrist testing or looking for retinal detachment ever since I can remember... something about the eye shape being distorted I think causing this to be a risk factor.

This is just one of the factors I took as an omen to cancel surgery, why would I want to subject pretty messed up eyes to the additional stress of surgery? My eyes (along with common sense, knowledgeable acquaintances & research including this site) basically told me "please don't cut us we can't handle it!"

Reshaping a warped eye would be one thing, but removing most of the cornea to try and compensate for a warped eye? Two wrongs don't make a right!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2007 2:56 pm 
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mark5767 wrote:
I am a 40 year old high myope (-8 for like 10 years) and I seem to recall my optometrist testing or looking for retinal detachment ever since I can remember... something about the eye shape being distorted I think causing this to be a risk factor.


Interesting. I've been -8 for several years too, but I'm only 27. Maybe that's why my eye Dr. had never mentioned having to check for retinal detachment before. Maybe retinal detachment becomes a risk as you get older.

I wish I had a clue that my eyes were screwed up more than I thought...like the fact that having a -8 script can cause more problems for you other than simply just needing those glasses or contacts to correct that -8. But, why would my eye Dr. let me in on little secrets like those, like what's in store for me in the future with such a strong script...when he's trying to convince me to have LASIK, which actually increases those risks! Or maybe my eye Dr. just sucked at his job. Who knows! I hadn't even heard the words "retinal detachment" till I came to this forum! It's pretty ridiculous that I have to be educated about this stuff by random people on the internet because doctors suck. It's pretty ridiculous that I have to be educated about this stuff AT ALL because doctors suck. You just can't put your faith in your doctors anymore. You just can't rely on them, trusting that they are doing the best thing.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2007 6:08 pm 
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From wikipedia...

Quote:
Retinal detachment is more common in those with severe or extreme myopia (above 5-6 diopters), as their eyes are longer and the retina is stretched thin. The lifetime risk increases to 1 in 20.[5] Myopia is associated with 67% of retinal detachment cases. Patients suffering from a detachment related to myopia tend to be younger than non-myopic detachment patients.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retinal_detachment

There are more links in the article that are possibly more authoritative than wikipedia of course.

So yes, it's odd that your eye doctor had not mentioned this even if you're in your 20's. I am pretty certain my eye doctor was looking for signs of this when I was that young. I've had many different optometrists over the years. One in particular about four years ago was strongly anti-lasik and listed many of the complications discussed on this site.

Unfortunately, my current optometrists are "co-managing" lasik patients (a nice word for taking kickbacks?) so I pretty much have to ignore their views in this area.

As a high myope who narrowly avoided surgery this site is a good source for discussions of eye issues that you might not get elsewhere including your optometrist. I still trust my current optometrist for basic eye care, but as with anything important in life it never hurts to get second & third opinions from different dis-interested sources. It certainly is a shame the way lasik is marketed and discussed among some eye professionals including my current one. However, I would definitely visit some different optometrists if they do not address your concerns satisfactorily. I've had to switch dentists before due to really shoddy work... I guess it can happen in any profession I'm afraid!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2007 7:21 pm 
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mark5767 wrote:
From wikipedia...

Quote:
Retinal detachment is more common in those with severe or extreme myopia (above 5-6 diopters), as their eyes are longer and the retina is stretched thin. The lifetime risk increases to 1 in 20.[5] Myopia is associated with 67% of retinal detachment cases. Patients suffering from a detachment related to myopia tend to be younger than non-myopic detachment patients.




So before LASIK, the chance that I will have a retinal detachment sometime in my life WAS a 1 in only 20 chance. After LASIK...what the hell is it??? Like, a 1 in *some ridiculously low number* chance???

Super...great...grand. So, basically...I WILL have retinal detachment sometime before I die. Well, isn't that something pleasent to look forward to???

Also, I read this on the wikipedia page you posted:

Quote:
Individuals prone to retinal detachment due to a high level of myopia are encouraged to avoid activities where there is a risk of shock to the head or eyes, although without direct trauma to the eye the evidence base for this may be unconvincing.[5] Some doctors recommend avoiding activities that increase pressure in the eye, including diving, skydiving, again with little supporting evidence. According to one medical website, retinal detachment does not happen as a result of straining your eyes, bending or, heavy lifting.[14] Therefore, heavy weightlifting would appear to be fine. However, two recent scientific articles [15][16] have noted cases of retinal detachment or maculopathy due to weightlifting (specifically with the Valsalva method), and a third documented an increase in blood pressure in the eye during weightlifting [17].


Really? Doctors recommend avoiding activities that increase pressure in the eye? Funny, because when I asked my LASIK surgeon if my having a -8 script made me any less than a perfect candidate for LASIK or put me at any kind of risk...she said..."NO. It's perfectlly safe and I specialize in giving LASIK to high myopes. I just recently did it on someone with that very same prescription" Gotta love that pressure from that suction ring! I'm sure that was awesomely healthy for my eyes! Also, I've been sky diving TWO TIMES. Maybe that should be a question or a warning on the stupid papers they make you fill out before having LASIK.

So, in review: I was a -8, I've been sky diving twice, and I had my eyeballs sucked on while having LASIK. Retinal detachment...here I come!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2007 8:35 pm 
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Regrets, I would take information on Wikipedia with a grain of salt, there aren't really good controls to make sure it's authoritative or even accurate. So while it may be worth considering, you would want to check with a reputable eye doctor before you start worrying about retinal detachment. Sounds like the causes are not well understood, but I think in an eye exam they can tell if there are warning signs. If you get it checked once a year and the warning signs are not present you are probably fine. And if they do catch some indications I think there are treatments available. I'm kind of talking out of my behind now, but I would not take anything medical on wikipedia that seriously without checking with a real doctor also.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 10:42 pm 
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mark5767 wrote:
Regrets, I would take information on Wikipedia with a grain of salt, there aren't really good controls to make sure it's authoritative or even accurate. So while it may be worth considering, you would want to check with a reputable eye doctor before you start worrying about retinal detachment. Sounds like the causes are not well understood, but I think in an eye exam they can tell if there are warning signs. If you get it checked once a year and the warning signs are not present you are probably fine. And if they do catch some indications I think there are treatments available. I'm kind of talking out of my behind now, but I would not take anything medical on wikipedia that seriously without checking with a real doctor also.


I hope you're right, because that's friggin scary!


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 Post subject: High refractive error risk factor for poor LASIK outcome
PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2007 12:24 am 
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Regrets said:

Quote:
My LASIK surgeon reassured me that my -8 script made me no less of an awesome candidate for LASIK than anyone else.


High refractive error of any kind is a risk factor for a poor LASIK outcome.
Your doctor knew that.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2007 8:14 pm 
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thanks everyone for your 'opinons'. My gut tells me that Lasik is most likely the major factor for retinal detachment in this case.

Regrets - I hope you get a chance to read this - I wanted to say, please don't freak out about what only 'might' happen. It wasn't my intention to start a thread that might upset you or anyone, there is no doubt that you have been through more than you're fair share of bs and my heart breaks when I read some of your posts. I know it is easy for me to say because I have been very fortunate to dodge the Lasik bullet. However, my 61 y.o. mother in law had lasik in 1997 (at age 50) and she too was a high'ish myope (-5, -6) and has so far been fine, structurally wise.

Your previous optometrist was extremely incompetent - in my opinion, for not discussing the possiblity of retinal detachment with you being a -8. I have been -8, -9 for 15+ years and have had several eye docs in that time and every one of them - even the PRO Lasik ones have commented on that issue. But, having said that - it is only something to be aware of - its not a for sure thing - that's death, taxes and a lack of morals in refractive eye surgeons (in my opinion).


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2007 6:21 pm 
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grateful wrote:

Regrets - I hope you get a chance to read this - I wanted to say, please don't freak out about what only 'might' happen. It wasn't my intention to start a thread that might upset you or anyone, there is no doubt that you have been through more than you're fair share of bs and my heart breaks when I read some of your posts. I know it is easy for me to say because I have been very fortunate to dodge the Lasik bullet. However, my 61 y.o. mother in law had lasik in 1997 (at age 50) and she too was a high'ish myope (-5, -6) and has so far been fine, structurally wise.

Your previous optometrist was extremely incompetent - in my opinion, for not discussing the possiblity of retinal detachment with you being a -8. I have been -8, -9 for 15+ years and have had several eye docs in that time and every one of them - even the PRO Lasik ones have commented on that issue. But, having said that - it is only something to be aware of - its not a for sure thing - that's death, taxes and a lack of morals in refractive eye surgeons (in my opinion).


Grateful,

You?re right, I need to not freak about what ?might? happen. I know it wasn?t your intention to upset me. Unfortunately, ever since LASIK I?ve turned into a complete spazz, and I tend to freak out and get worried pretty easily when it comes to my eyes. As a matter of fact, your post actually taught me something, and that?s why I come here?so, THANK YOU!!! Like I said, I wasn?t even aware of the fact that my extreme nearsightedness put me at risk of retinal detachment. Again, I should probably try not to WORRY about it, but it?s still better to AWARE of the risk, rather than be ignorant.


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