Exposing the LASIK Scam

One Surgeon at a Time
It is currently Wed Sep 26, 2018 9:34 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 23 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject: Will the bad go away naturally?
PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 1:57 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2005 4:28 pm
Posts: 643
Hi Xpatient,

Visual improvement is possible - sometimes healing takes a long time. Overcorrected patients may regress. What doesn't go away is the FLAP and its associated shortcomings (wrinkles, interface glare, nerve damage, other potential problems too numerous to mention here) and surgically induced higher order aberrations.

Find out how much of your 'effective blur' is due to higher order aberrations by comparing your pre and post-op individual and total higher order aberrations.

Glasses help many with residual or induced refractive error due to sphere (nearsighted or farsightedness) and cylinder (astigmatism) but to correct higher order aberrations you would need to be fitted with some hard contact lenses.


Top
 
 Post subject: no such thing as "successful lasik"
PostPosted: Thu Jul 27, 2006 3:11 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 2:57 am
Posts: 243
This goes to show that everyone who gets lasik has some sort of problem. You stand correct, the flap stays for life and can come dislodged years later from a poke in the eye :shock: The induced high order aberrations stay for life, distorting vision and producing bad "effects" at night. Lasik cant even get most people to plano! :roll:

_________________
Lasik damages every eye! Lasik induces more aberrations, even so called "wavefront!" Stick to glasses!


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: "Successful LASIK" is an oxymoron
PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2007 5:03 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 10:58 pm
Posts: 130
Quote:
http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/LASIK/when.htm
Quote:
When is LASIK not for me?
You are probably NOT a good candidate for refractive surgery if:
You actively participate in contact sports. You participate in boxing, wrestling, martial arts or other activities in which blows to the face and eyes are a normal occurrence.


http://www.jcrsjournal.org/article/PIIS ... 0/abstract

Volume 33, Issue 7, Pages 1332-1335 (July 2007)

Late traumatic LASIK flap loss during contact sport

Manfred Tetz, MD, Liliana Werner, MD, PhDCorresponding Author Informationemail address, Matthias M?ller, PhD, Ulrich Dietze, MD

Accepted 6 March 2007

Three years and 5 months after uneventful laser in situ keratomileusis, the left eye of a 39-year-old man was struck by the finger of a friend while the two were practicing karate, resulting in loss of the flap. The patient had performed this contact sport regularly for years. When last seen 16 weeks after injury, the best corrected visual acuity in the left eye was 20/40 with −1.75 −0.50 ? 30. Mild central corneal haze was observed under slitlamp examination, the flap was missing, and the patient complained of dysphotopsia. Pachymetry in the left eye was 394 μm, with an irregular corneal contour. Flap loss is a serious complication because severe irregular astigmatism and unpredictable refractive change can occur. This case highlights the vulnerability of flaps to trauma even late postoperatively.


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: "Successful LASIK" is an oxymoron
PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2007 8:55 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 5:16 am
Posts: 138
Location: New Jersey
surgieyes wrote:
Quote:
http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/LASIK/when.htm
Quote:
When is LASIK not for me?
You are probably NOT a good candidate for refractive surgery if:
You actively participate in contact sports. You participate in boxing, wrestling, martial arts or other activities in which blows to the face and eyes are a normal occurrence.


http://www.jcrsjournal.org/article/PIIS ... 0/abstract

Volume 33, Issue 7, Pages 1332-1335 (July 2007)

Late traumatic LASIK flap loss during contact sport

Manfred Tetz, MD, Liliana Werner, MD, PhDCorresponding Author Informationemail address, Matthias M?ller, PhD, Ulrich Dietze, MD

Accepted 6 March 2007

Three years and 5 months after uneventful laser in situ keratomileusis, the left eye of a 39-year-old man was struck by the finger of a friend while the two were practicing karate, resulting in loss of the flap. The patient had performed this contact sport regularly for years. When last seen 16 weeks after injury, the best corrected visual acuity in the left eye was 20/40 with −1.75 −0.50 ? 30. Mild central corneal haze was observed under slitlamp examination, the flap was missing, and the patient complained of dysphotopsia. Pachymetry in the left eye was 394 μm, with an irregular corneal contour. Flap loss is a serious complication because severe irregular astigmatism and unpredictable refractive change can occur. This case highlights the vulnerability of flaps to trauma even late postoperatively.


:shock: Okay...absolutely terrifying.

What's dysphotopsia?


Top
 
 Post subject: Dysphotopsia
PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2007 5:43 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:06 am
Posts: 621
Dysphotopsia is a disorder which presents with abnormal vision such as vaseline vision, halos, starbursts, rings, arcs, streaks etc.

Postoperative dysphotopsia is the rule rather than the exception for corneal refractive surgeries.

_________________
We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark. The real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light. -Plato


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 8:30 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Thu Aug 09, 2007 4:28 am
Posts: 38
Just another example of GROSS MALPRACTICE in the refractive eye surgery industry. I saw/heard no mention, warning, or concern for patients in the literature, informed consent, flunkie evaluation, or video (at Lasik Plus office) about this severe life activity-limiting consequence of Lasik. The company and employees, including the surgeon/butcher do not possess even the most basic empathy or concern for the health, sanctity, or quality of life for other human beings. And what compounds this crime against Lasik patients is that most of them go through life not knowing of their vulnerable corneas so they can't even exercise prudent care in preventing a blinding accident. But, of course NONE OF THEM would probably have ever considered surgery had they known of this definite outcome of the procedure. The hiding of this fact is simply the ZENITH OF MALPRACTICE.

When I confronted my Lasik PLus surgeon/butcher (post-Lasik) about how upset I was of not being told or informed of the flap never healing, he decided to dig even deeper in his devious treasure chest of lies. He stated that the Navy approved Lasik for its test pilots because they were confident of the flap's integrity to withstand the g forces of the explosion of the ejection seat. And this my folks, is exactly OPPOSITE OF THE TRUTH - just what you will get from purveyors of Lasik and other refractive eye surgeries. These people are sociopaths; I am concvinced!


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 4:56 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 5:16 am
Posts: 138
Location: New Jersey
Standards wrote:
When I confronted my Lasik PLus surgeon/butcher (post-Lasik) about how upset I was of not being told or informed of the flap never healing, he decided to dig even deeper in his devious treasure chest of lies. He stated that the Navy approved Lasik for its test pilots because they were confident of the flap's integrity to withstand the g forces of the explosion of the ejection seat. And this my folks, is exactly OPPOSITE OF THE TRUTH - just what you will get from purveyors of Lasik and other refractive eye surgeries. These people are sociopaths; I am concvinced!


HA! FYI- I have a friend in the Air Force who can NOT fly because he does not have perfect vision...he wears glasses and contacts. He told me that you can NOT fly if you need glasses or contacts b/c the g forces will knock the glasses off of your face, and tear the contacts right out of your eyes. He then told me that he was considering LASIK just because his contacts are annoying. He then said, HOWEVER, I still will NOT be able to fly even if I have LASIK because there has NOT been enough research or proof that the g forces will not also tear your flap off, just like it would a contact. I then gave him my whole anti-LASIK rant, and now he's not considering LASIK AT ALL. Yes he's in the Air Force and your Dr. was talking about the Navy...but lets be real....your Dr. is a HUGE LIAR!!!!!


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2007 11:28 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:23 pm
Posts: 2080
Cornea. 2003 Mar;22(2):142-5.

Laser in situ keratomileusis flap stability during simulated aircraft ejection in a rabbit model.

Goodman RL, Johnson DA, Dillon H, Edelhauser HF, Waller SG.
Ophthalmology service, Mike O'Callaghan Federal Hospital, 99MDG/SGOSE, Nellis AFB, NV 89191, USA. rkgoodman@yahoo.com

PURPOSE: To determine the stability of the laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) flap in a rabbit model when subjected to vertical acceleration at nine times the force of gravity (+9 Gz) in an aircraft cockpit ejection simulator.

METHODS: Thirty-six eyes from 25 New Zealand white rabbits underwent LASIK flap creation without laser photoablation. One month after surgery, the rabbits were sedated and harnessed in a cockpit ejection seat simulator used to train United States Air Force pilots. They then underwent a controlled rapid-sequence ejection at +9 Gz. Subsequently, the rabbits were euthanized and the corneas harvested for microscopic examination. Refractive measurements and corneal examination were made before LASIK flap creation and prior to and after the +9 Gz ejections. Determination of LASIK flap dislocation was based on clinical observation of flap slippage or a significant shift in pre-ejection to postejection cylinder axis.

RESULTS: The average preoperative refraction of the rabbit eye was +1.83 D + 3.25 D x 086 degrees. The average change from pre-ejection to postejection was 0.04 D sphere, 0.02 D cylinder, 6.8 axis degrees, and 0.04 D spherical equivalent. The pre-ejection to postejection measurements were not statistically significantly different by a paired test. Laser in situ keratomileusis flap dislocation or ejection-induced corneal folds or striae were not clinically observed. Histologic examination revealed well-healed LASIK flaps but no reactive keratocytes at the central stromal-stromal interface.

CONCLUSIONS: Healed LASIK flaps as created in this rabbit model without laser ablation are stable when subjected to a rapid vertical ejection at nine times the force of gravity.

BE's comment: First, the surgeons who did this should be prosecuted for animal cruelty. Secondly, these bunnies were wearing goggles and told to keep their eyes tightly closed. But the biggest problem that I have with this study is that the informed consent provided to the bunnies did not disclose that they would be executed at the conclusion. Here is another prime example of lack of informed consent in LASIK. :P

_________________
Broken Eyes

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato


Top
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 23 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group  
Design By Poker Bandits