Exposing the LASIK Scam

One Surgeon at a Time
It is currently Sun May 20, 2018 10:01 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Dominant Eye undercorrected
PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 3:40 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2006 3:52 am
Posts: 8
Hello.
I'm so frustrated! I had Lasik in July of 2004 when I was 24. I knew a couple months after my surgery that my right eye (dominant eye) wasn't seeing as well as my left. My surgeon insisted I wait a year to see how things go. After a year he told me sure, my right eye is a bit undercorrected 20/30 but my left eye is 20/15 and I should be able to ignore it and get used to it.
I went back to him again at the 2 year mark. I had been so depressed about not being able to get used to the difference that I had to be put on medications. It was all I could think about. I didn't want to do ANYTHING anymore. At this meeting, his technician who takes the info asked me why my non dominant eye would be bugging me so much. I informed her that it's my dominant eye. Apparently her records showed the opposite.

Anyway he tells me that my problem is dry eye and meibomian? gland dsyfunction. However I had a second opinion from another opthalmologist who said I didn't have either of these issues. So he put me on Restasis. I have tried a contact lens in that right eye but my left eye is overcorrected so I get dizzy and nauseous when wearing it. I can't wear glasses during the day because I have very sensitive eyes and light hurts them. I don't know what to do.
It's now been 3 years and i'm going through a depression again. I feel so cheated. I've been trying to get my records for 2 months from his office so I can go see another lasik specialist to help me get lenses to wear. I get 20 questions as to why I want them.

Will I ever get used to my dominant eye being under corrected? Can I get a lens to make my overcorrected eye not so overcorrected? I'll wear contacts again if this will all just go away and I can go one day of my life not thinking about my eyes.


Top
 
 Post subject: LASIK is not precise...
PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 11:43 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:06 am
Posts: 621
Hi Dixienpinch,

Although your surgeon's office may very well have made a mistake in your eye dominance (ask for a complete copy of your charts for your home records and check and see if that's the case) you still could have ended up the way you are simply because excimer laser eye surgeries like LASIK are not all that precise.

To a LASIK surgeon, 20/40 in both eyes (barely legal to drive) is a huge success! LASIK surgeons also think they are great if they rob an older patient of near vision to get them better distance vision... although most of us spend the bulk of our time dealing with things that are close to us.

You will have a hard time finding a surgeon who will do surgery to 'enhance', and I use this word in its loosest possible sense... a 20/30 eye. Why? They may very well overshoot and overcorrect. Overcorrection is worse than undercorrection, especially as you age.

Were you nearsighted or farsighted? Did you have a high or moderate correction? Did you have astigmatism before surgery?

You should go to a regular Optometrist, NOT a LASIK surgeon and SEE if he can correct you with the big OWL device [by refraction] to 20/20 in both eyes. Then ask to try soft contact lenses in both your eyes that will bring you to 20/20. Your overcorrected eye could be made 'no longer overcorrected' and your undercorrected eye brought up to where it should be. Some of the new brands like Oasis are pretty comfortable even for some patients who have permanent dry eye from LASIK. Of course if you are a former high myope, normal soft lenses won't fit your surgically misshapen corneas.

But if your correction was small or moderate they just might.

Hard lenses would be the next best choice.

You should avoid further excimer laser surgeries on your precious corneas like the plague that they are.

Many patients on this board are legally blind, in pain from dry eye, disabled in dim light or have generally poor quality vision all the time
because they were sold a line of marketing BS by a surgeon who knew his product is harmful.

Dry eye and meibomian gland dysfunction can interfere with your vision, but you'd think it would affect BOTH eyes. You can ask for a Schirmer's test and find out if you have dry eye. Make sure they anaesthetize your eye before they do it or the results aren't valid - you're just reading reflex tears.

One common thread is that Ophthalmologists seem to lie alot about what's really going on with patients' eyes.

Find an honest Optometrist who doesn't comanage LASIK and see if you can get a contact lens that works. If you need someone who is a specialist in fitting surgically damaged corneas let us know and we'll find you one. You may have to travel a bit.

You could try glasses that come with those cool clip-on sunglasses as well.

_________________
We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark. The real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light. -Plato


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: LASIK is not precise...
PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 1:58 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 5:16 am
Posts: 138
Location: New Jersey
Scientist: "Of course if you are a former high myope, normal soft lenses won't fit your surgically misshapen corneas.

But if your correction was small or moderate they just might.

Hard lenses would be the next best choice."



My prescription was -8 in both eyes. Do you think that I'll be able to wear soft lenses, or will I most likely need hard lenses?

I don't even have a pair of glasses yet because I was telling myself it's only been about 6 months since I had LASIK and I wanted to give my eyes time to adjust... but really 6 months is NOT a short amount of time for someone to tolerate seeing like this! I just decided tonight that I'm going to get glasses because I can't live like this anymore!!!


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 2:58 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Mon Jun 25, 2007 1:49 am
Posts: 36
Well, I don't know if you will ever get used to your dominant eye being undercorrected. That is very hard to say since you have had your normal cornea altered. What may help you more than anything is to get a pair of glasses prescribed by an OD. I was overcorrected in my non-dominant eye and I can not get used to it. I feel as if I have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome everyday because I am overworking myself at trying to keep myself balanced. It is terrible. I think that everyday I loose a bit of my ability to see up close in the dominant eye because it is trying to match the overcorrection of the non-dominant eye.


Top
 
 Post subject: Don't walk - run to the Optometrist!
PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2007 4:37 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2005 4:28 pm
Posts: 643
Regrets,

You should go to one of those one hour vision places... they can do a refraction AND make the glasses. Spoil yourself with cute frames.

Let us know what your vision is like with glasses. Is it as good as BEFORE LASIK with glasses? Do you have NVD's with your glasses?

Overcorrection IS hard to deal with, but if it is modest and the imbalance between your eyes is not too great, glasses can help. You need to force yourself to put them on and wear them all hours when your eyes are open and not be tempted to take them off... because you want to get your brain back into a state where it 'expects' to see normally. If you don't get used to your post-LASIK imbalance in a few months you probably won't. Time for some glasses or maybe ONE contact lens?

Regrets said:
Quote:
My prescription was -8 in both eyes. Do you think that I'll be able to wear soft lenses, or will I most likely need hard lenses?


Anything over -6 is HIGH myopia. To attempt to correct for this, the surgeon flattens the front of your cornea. Now you have this huge MESA on the front of your eye, and the soft lenses made for the round eyes of normal people are just not going to fit. Actually the shape is WORSE than a mesa, because the flap is larger than the area it once covered after all that lasering, and the edges lap over creating something that more resembles an impact crater - flat in the center, but with a RIM. I like the devastation theme here, it fits.

Some day the contact lens industry may catch up to the idea that there would be a huge market for soft torics that would fit post-refractive patients, but it hasn't happened yet.

You would probably need a hard 'reverse geometry' lens. The lens has a dip in the center to fit into that 'impact crater'.


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2007 3:29 am 
Offline
 WWW  Profile

Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2006 2:58 am
Posts: 20
Location: Miami
Dear Dixienpinch;

Please don't get discouraged and depressed and most importantly, don't have any more invasive procedures. I have never seen a second surgery correct the error of a first surgery. The population with post-lasik vision and comfort issues is growing dramatically. In my opinion there are tens of thousands of patients who have had lasik and other refractive surgical procedures with significant problems here in the United States. God only knows how many people there are world-wide suffering from significant vision loss.

Contact lens laboratories are slowly becoming aware of your problems. Synergeyes Corp. has devoted significant financial resources to the development of a post-surgical lens. Other labs are coming out with both soft lens and gas permeable designs to assist you. Unfortunately, new refractive surgical technologies are coming out faster than the technologies to correct the problems that the former create.

The bottom line is to find an optometrist specializing in contact lenses and corneal rehabilitation. If you seek out a lasik specialist, common sense dictates that he/she will only want to give you a surgical solution.

Edward Boshnick, O.D., F.A.A.O.
Miami, Fl
www.eyefreedom.com

_________________
I specialize in treating post-refractive surgical problems


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2007 12:00 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:23 pm
Posts: 2080
drbosh,

I love your response here so much that I'm going to post it under the "Notable Quotes" thread on the General forum. I hope you don't mind.

You're awesome. Thanks for posting here.

_________________
Broken Eyes

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Don't walk - run to the Optometrist!
PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 4:38 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 5:16 am
Posts: 138
Location: New Jersey
Eye wrote:
Regrets,

You should go to one of those one hour vision places... they can do a refraction AND make the glasses. Spoil yourself with cute frames. Let us know what your vision is like with glasses. Is it as good as BEFORE LASIK with glasses? Do you have NVD's with your glasses?


I don't think I can afford cute frames. After wasting so much money on having LASIK, I think I'll just be using my old frames. I like them and they were reasonably new too. I think I'm going to go get new lenses this week and I'll let you know how they work. I have 2 different prescriptions written up. I don't know if I should choose the stronger of the two, or have them test me again and see what they come up with.

What are NVDs?

Eye wrote:

Regrets said:
Quote:
My prescription was -8 in both eyes. Do you think that I'll be able to wear soft lenses, or will I most likely need hard lenses?


Anything over -6 is HIGH myopia. To attempt to correct for this, the surgeon flattens the front of your cornea. Now you have this huge MESA on the front of your eye, and the soft lenses made for the round eyes of normal people are just not going to fit. Actually the shape is WORSE than a mesa, because the flap is larger than the area it once covered after all that lasering, and the edges lap over creating something that more resembles an impact crater - flat in the center, but with a RIM. I like the devastation theme here, it fits.

Some day the contact lens industry may catch up to the idea that there would be a huge market for soft torics that would fit post-refractive patients, but it hasn't happened yet.

You would probably need a hard 'reverse geometry' lens. The lens has a dip in the center to fit into that 'impact crater'.


This pisses me off to no end. The Dr. that did my LASIK said that it woud be VERY rare if I didn't just come out perfect, but worse/rare case scenario, I'd be able to wear glasses and/or contacts again to bring me back up to perfect vision. She didn't say anything about not being to wear soft lenses anymore and having to go to uncomfortable hard lenses. Also, after seeing something along those lines here at Thelasikflap.com, I asked my 2nd opinion Dr. if it was true if I would no longer be able to wear soft lenses and woud have to move to hard lenses, he said that's not true. I'm just completely disgusted. I can't believe that we live in a world where doctors are able to lie to people and do these kinds of things to them...I'm just SO TERRIBLY DISGUSTED I want to scream.


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2007 1:17 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:06 am
Posts: 621
Regrets said:

Quote:
I have 2 different prescriptions written up. I don't know if I should choose the stronger of the two, or have them test me again and see what they come up with.


In my experience, the weaker prescription is easier to live with in most lighting conditions.

NVDs are night vision disturbances. Halos, starbursts - etc.

Quote:
The Dr. that did my LASIK said that it woud be VERY rare if I didn't just come out perfect, but worse/rare case scenario, I'd be able to wear glasses and/or contacts again to bring me back up to perfect vision. She didn't say anything about not being to wear soft lenses anymore and having to go to uncomfortable hard lenses.


She wasn't telling you the truth. The majority of patients don't come out 'perfect' and have refractive error that would be helped with glasses. It is well known, also, that it's a challenge to fit a post-surgical cornea with a contact lens of ANY kind, especially if the surgical correction was large like yours.

Quote:
I asked my 2nd opinion Dr. if it was true if I would no longer be able to wear soft lenses and woud have to move to hard lenses, he said that's not true.


Wow, she's LYING. Ask her how that nice round soft lens is supposed to fit on your surgically flattened former -8 corneas? Ask her to do a test fit for you to prove that you can still wear soft lenses.

Quote:
I'm just completely disgusted. I can't believe that we live in a world where doctors are able to lie to people and do these kinds of things to them...I'm just SO TERRIBLY DISGUSTED I want to scream.


Your feelings are appropriate. Just make sure you direct your anger at the right people. By confronting the people who DO THIS STUFF, and also alerting the innocent folks in your community, you can prevent new victims. Doctors are able to continue to lie about this stuff because too many of us let them get away with it. If every patient were like you and me LASIK wouldn't survive another week.

_________________
We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark. The real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light. -Plato


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Don't walk - run to the Optometrist!
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2007 12:36 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:23 pm
Posts: 2080
I'd like to add to this discussion that I was *able* to wear regular soft lenses after LASIK, but they only got me from point A to point B visually because they could only correct the refractive error, not the higher order distortions. I can get by with glasses or soft lenses for daytime and bright light situations, but not in dim light. Soft lenses seem to fit my eyes with no problem, even though the center of my cornea was flattened for a -4.25 correction, which is much less than a -8 correction. I don't know any -8 patients who attempted to wear soft lenses after LASIK. But I wouldn't rule them out -- it doesn't cost anything to try a pair at the ODs office. Just keep in mind they can only correct simple refractive error -- not the garbage some of us see. No doubt a reverse geometry hard lens would work better than a soft lens if you can get a good fit and tolerate the lenses. My new lenses are hard in the center with a soft skirt (Synergeyes), but they're not reverse geometry and I do have some issues with them, but thankfully I've managed to live with them so far.

As far as which script to use, use the one written by an optometrist, not a LASIK surgeon. For me personally, the stronger scripts (helps reduce the size of the aberrations by a fraction) work best but I must wear reading glasses with them. And I always feel a bit overcorrected. Either way it's a trade off.

_________________
Broken Eyes

"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2007 4:19 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 5:16 am
Posts: 138
Location: New Jersey
I went to Pearle last night and ordered glasses. I used my old frames...thank gosh I kept them! I thought lenses were the cheap part and the frames were expensive. The lenses alone are costing $230.00!!! I'd be spending over $500.00 on these glasses if I didn't have frames to use! This freedom from glasses after LASIK is AWESOME...and VERY cost effective! Saving me "LOTS of money in the long run!" :roll:


I went with the slightly weaker prescription because the stronger one I had said that both of my eyes were the same, so when I asked the guy at Pearle to help me decide on which one, he had me cover each eye to see if they were the same or different. My right eye is a LOT worse than my left, so we went with the script that showed a difference between my two eyes, which was also the more recent one written up. I got some kind of special anti-glare lense as well. I hope that helps me...since it cost $100 extra.


I will let you all know how these glasses work for me when I pick them up tonight.


I'm still flabbergasted at the fact that my LASIK Dr. straight up lied about wearing glasses and contacts after surgery. Saying I'd be able to be fully corrected if I was a RARE case that didn't turn out perfect from surgery...saying that I'd simply be able to go back to contacts, with no mention of the fact that I'd most likely never be able to wear soft lenses again...when I asked if my high prescription of -8 made me any less of a great candidate for LASIK, she said it's NO problem AT ALL. I hate her so much it's INSANE. I seriously need to meditate or something because I don't like having so much hate for someone...it's not healthy. I used to be so happy-go-lucky...and now I'm a wreck.


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2007 4:41 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 5:16 am
Posts: 138
Location: New Jersey
Got my glasses. They're alright. They obviously don't fix my night time problems (glare, starbursts, etc.)...but I see a bit better in general.

Something feels off about them though. I just don't know if it's because I'm not used to them...maybe I see well now and I'm not used to that. I haven't been seeing well since about Feb. 2007 (8 months ago) because I had my LASIK in March 2007 and my eye Dr. had given me the wrong glasses prescription and I had to wear those for a month before I had my LASIK. What I would give to go back and just be able to put my old contacts back in!

I don't know...with my new glasses I feel like I'm taller...or shorter...or something weird with my depth preception. I felt like I was going to trip last night when I put them on. I wish I had a good eye Dr. to go to so I could make sure these glasses are really right for me. I think the people at Pearle said I have about a month to see a Dr. to be told that I need a new prescription. After that, I wont be able to return these glasses. Maybe they are good and I just need to get used to them. I can definitely see an improvement with them though, which is good.


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 1:36 am 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 5:16 am
Posts: 138
Location: New Jersey
PS.

I forgot to answer Eye specifically. No, these glasses definitely don't make me see as well as I did before LASIK. ALso, they don't fix my NVDs either. I think the NVDs are slightly fixed since everything is more in focus, but they are still there.

I'm not wearing my glasses all the time though. It's weird, I can't describe it. I don't know if I like them, and I may have just wasted $230.00. I feel like things in the far distance look a lot better....but not perfect, not like how I saw before LASIK...but BETTER, which is good. However, it's the close up stuff that looks off...like everything 20 feet away and closer. It's odd, kind of trippy looking. Kinda distorted maybe, but not majorly. Like rectangles kind of look like rhombuses. I don't know. I wish I could explain this better or have someone be able to see through my eyes. It's frustrating. :? I'll probably end up putting these glasses back in the case and never using them...just flushing more money down the toilet. :cry:

uuuuuuhhhhhhhhhhhhhggggggggggg :x


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2007 3:45 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2006 3:52 am
Posts: 8
Thanks so much for all your replies. My left eye was -4.25 with an astigmatism of -0.25 and my right eye was -4.25 with no astigmatism. I'm just having a lot of trouble adjusting to my left eye seeing better than my right. I tried getting just one contact lens for my right eye which brought it to 20/15 but for some reason I kept getting really dizzy and had trouble seeing up close. I don't know why, but for some reason I can't ignore my dominant eye being undercorrected.

I know it's partially because i'm aware of it all the time. I need to definitely try to ignore it more and get over it. I do have a pair of glasses that I can wear if I want but my eyes are VERY light sensitive and I get headaches if I don't wear sunglasses outside. Even when it's overcast out I need them.

I'm going to go back to my optometrist as soon as I have some money so I can see if she can make my overcorrected eye not so overcorrected and correct my right eye. It's going to suck wearing contacts again but at least I won't be annoyed all the time by the difference in my eyes. Do they even make contacts that can fix an overcorrected eye? I'm clueless about that.
I don't think I have dry eye and I think i'm wasting 40.00 every two months on this restasis. I haven't noticed any improvement in my vision. Instead I always have huge black circles and bags under my eyes. That started when I started using restasis.
Thanks so much for your responses. I appreciate it and I'm glad there's someone else out there that experiences what I do.


Top
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2007 11:57 pm 
Offline
 Profile

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 1:06 am
Posts: 621
Dixienpinch asked:
Quote:
Do they even make contacts that can fix an overcorrected eye?


Yes, if you can still tolerate them after the nerve damage from the surgery. Also you may be restricted as to the type of lens you wear. With your moderate pre-surgical myopia you may be one of the lucky ones who is still able to wear regular soft lenses.

_________________
We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark. The real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light. -Plato


Top
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group  
Design By Poker Bandits